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Author Topic: The World in 1990  (Read 1166 times)
Shoobe01
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« on: October 31, 2010, 02:22:21 pm »

With the influx of new troops, you might need to know what the world holds for you, and how it might affect your day to day jobs as troops in the Berlin Brigade.

Remember, this is not a secure forum. Anyone can see it, even our enemies if they are clever enough to use a computer, so do not discuss secure briefings, specifics of your orders, or your deployments in detail. Do not spread rumors, or discuss other's orders or deployment details.

- Steven Hoober
  31 Oct, 1990
« Last Edit: November 12, 2010, 03:50:05 pm by Shoobe01 » Logged
Shoobe01
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« Reply #1 on: October 31, 2010, 02:25:13 pm »

Let's kick this off by making sure everyone is on the same page. Some of you never watch the news, so in case you missed anything, read this first:

George H.W. Bush became U.S. president as of January 1989, taking over from two-term President Ronald Reagan, for whom he was the Vice President, both terms. George Bush has significant international experience as ambassador to the UN and envoy to China. He was also the Director of Central Intelligence (CIA), which leads the Soviets and certain other foreign powers to believe he is allied with the security services, and may mark a change in leadership structure in the U.S.

Gorbachev's domestic economic reforms, beginning in the mid 1980s, have given way to notable political reforms, with significant global considerations. Non-Party members are increasingly allowed in positions of power, press restrictions are being lifted and numerous meetings are held with Western powers. Most recently, Bush met with Gorbachev himself to discuss the 2 AUG invasion of Kuwait, and to add Soviet condemnation of the action. General promises of Soviet support for action were added as well.

Throughout 1989, a variety of mostly peaceful protests in several European Warsaw Pact countries, led to increasing freedoms from local governments, as well as the Soviet Union. Private land ownership has begun, and Soviet forces have begun to withdraw to domestic bases, joining with the remaining Soviet troops returning from their long-term failed excursion to Afghanistan.

Returning from Helsinki, Gorbachev retires to his Black Sea villa for private consultations and rumored reductions in the total number of Land Forces. He reportedly contracts an illness during this period, and on 17 SEPT 1990 announces via a taped statement where he is seen bundled up in a sweater in his living room, he is resigning from power. The next day, Vladimir Kryuchkov is elevated from chief of the KGB and makes a lengthy speech where he quotes Gorbachev's mid-80s statements on the "ship of socialism," apparently reaffirming that reforms are not a sea change to a market economy.

Starting in mid October, a number of reforms are modified or (according to some analysts) are rolled back. Press freedoms in the Soviet Union, for example, are technically the same, but in practice licenses must be issued for many activities, and no agencies have issued licenses as of today, 31 October 1990.


The 2 AUG Iraqi invasion of Kuwait took the world powers (and the Kuwaiti government) by surprise. The invasion is more or less over long-running accusations of Kuwait stealing oil (via slant drilling) and other longstanding border concerns. The attack is condemned by every world power, even those traditionally allied with Iraq, such as France, which cuts arms shipments and other economic ties immediately. Beginning 7 AUG, President Bush announces defensive assistance to traditional ally Saudi Arabia, which switches to a more aggressive policy the next day when Iraq declares Kuwait an Iraqi province, and begins to make additional threatening statements towards Saudi Arabia.

The US has deployed two carrier groups and had flown in several hundred combat aircraft.

By late October, several thousand US troops are in Saudia Arabia, and many more (and especially heavy equipment) are on their way by ship. An international coalition is being created to provide a more credible, and not entirely western force. Numerous Arab countries have joined or are inclined to, but US troops continue to provide the vast bulk of the forces gathering in Saudi Arabia.

Shortages of certain equipment, specialized troops and even special units have stripped US forces in Germany, and even some in Berlin. Many plans for reassignment or transition of units have been formally placed on hold pending the outcome of this crisis.
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warnick
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« Reply #2 on: November 12, 2010, 09:31:27 am »

Thanks to current operations in the Middle East the planned decommissioning of the 315th RRC is deferred.

As I'm sure many of you have noticed all reassignments have be suspended, and personnel scheduled for reassignment will be retained.  We will not be getting any additional resources as of this time. 

This is just a delay until operation in the Gulf cease.  All plans will be kept until a later date. 

In other words:  stop burning, pillaging, and stealing company supplies.  We may still have need for them.  It's back to business as usual around the 315th. 

Keep up the good work. As always use your head and don't be stupid.

Dylan Warnick
Commander 315th RRC
« Last Edit: November 12, 2010, 11:47:14 am by warnick » Logged
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