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Author Topic: Official East German Report. 08April2010  (Read 2966 times)
Stagg
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« on: April 08, 2010, 08:48:09 am »

The Plan was simple.  Attend Eastwind.  


Performance: Performance was excellent, all of the NVA troops arrived on the field in good spirits, and stayed for the whole thing minus a few who had to catch an early flight.
I’m pleased with my troop turn out.

Performance during the rest of the week:  No orders ever arrived for the Germans... So everything we did during the week, I made up! Some of it was based on the scenario reports we got from tascabe, but most was directed by my limited understanding of East German troops, and the DDR.

-In lieu of orders I started preparing our portion of the battlespace for a localized 'Defense in Depth'.  This included setting our encampment at the barn, preparing OP/LP locations, identifying likely crossing points, and creating pathways that allowed us to move undetected behind the border.
-All defensive tasks, that shouldn’t get us into trouble with the West.

-We messed(Dinned) with the Soviets in their encampment since no E.German Service&Support  had followed us to the border.
-This set us in their time schedule, but also helped us coordinate which was far more important.

-Once the war started our defense in depth was set to range from the Western boundary of the field to the Lake that guarded the Eastern flank of the Soviet Camp.
With two excellent OP/LPs on a ridge overlooking the border, and good sites for 2-3 more I felt this would give us enough advanced warning of NATO incursions, if the positions could be manned.
-The barn lay at the foot of that ridge. Its location in the middle (where the ridge looked most formidable from the NATO side) served as a location were we could move out and respond to NATO threats.  This worked in both plan and performance… as long as we actually left.
-In hindsight, we took an overly defensive posture.
-The barn was sweet... We had Oak floors, and furniture.
-Without orders to the contrary we decided that force preservation was more important than preventing NATO from roaming about in the remote portions of the Janke Mine.  If this really was an insignificant area then losing our troops to patrol it would be a criminal waste.      

-During this time we sustained one sick with the "Eastwind Plague", and one wounded (real injuries) from walking up our new trail.  It was slippery, in total darkness, and studded with short stumps.
Both recovered after a good nights sleep and some grumpiness.  
This strained our ability to guard half the field, and forced Stagg to find new ways to operate.

-Concurrently we realized that our actions were allowing NATO way to much initiative since they seemed capable of infiltrating our defenses.  A typical problem of the defense, which we solved when more manpower arrived.
-We gained that increased man power, when three Kampgroupen (Militia players) members arrived to help defend the mine during the day.   At night we could patrol forward to maintain the illusion that our numbers did not drop at night.
-We began patrolling across the border as well as conducting counter-reconnaissance on our side to find NATO patrolbase(s) and infiltration routes.
The Soviets were doing the same.  In addition the weather began to dry out the roads, allowing us to drive the UAZ and even BTR East behind the border.

-The roads were not completely dry, and eventually the UAZ became stuck.  And a Russian recovery team was assembled.
-Concurrently the NVA began constructing defenses overlooking a dry-weather ford, which the weather was quickly making capable of carrying vehicles.

-Just as the construction was ending, the Soviet recovery team ran into an ambush.  
They fought out of it, as we moved to the sound of the fight. But after crossing the several hundred meters as quickly as possible, we arriving just as the battle ended.  
-With our defensive positions basically finished, I decided to lend our full weigh to the UAZ recovery.  
-Recovery happened without incident partially thanks to our NATO prisoner’s help.
Thanks Stein!

-During the ambush several NATO troops were killed, and one captured.  Documents were also captured.  Notably a small notebook, with a mission directive to “Destabilize the Border.”

-Armed with this knowledge, we planned to occupy our positions over night (Friday) and start patrolling early Saturday morning.  Instead the weather turned bad, quickly, and the plan was changed.  Due partially to insufficient sleeping gear for NVA troops.
-We decided to stay inside our camps and leave early the next morning, since intell told us the weather would probably prevent our NATO opponents from operating also.

-The next morning we left and patrolled the WestGerman side  of the border where we could cut the tracks of NATO patrols more easily.
It worked and we followed at least two NATO patrols across the border into East Germany, from behind.

-Eventually we caught up with one of the patrols, and captured its three members.  Sustaining some wounded.  (or was Stagg the only one?)

-After returning to camp we gathered what information we could from the prisoners, and were preparing to leave when rumor of the war's end reached us.
-We were also informed that NATO had raided our barn and captured our BTR Driver (Coyote).  Not willing to leave him in the hands of the enemy, who may not return him for months after a ceasefire, we decided to mount a rescue.
-We quickly rounded up a team of Soviet and E.German troops to chase down and rescue our comrade.

-After tracking the NATO patrol to a remote cabin we stormed the place.  Deciding to NOT use grenades since no resistance was shaping up, and we wanted prisoners of our own.  We rescued our man, and also captured the NATO Commander, who was relaxing and eating lunch hoping that the war was over.  

Upon our return we learned that the war was indeed over.  
Afterwards we ceased to patrol across the border, but did send out one more patrol to recover wire and tools from our defenses.
While there we made sure that NATO had indeed left East Germany.
-The border was secure, and stable.
-Peace was returned, to our little piece of the border.  And we hoped to get word that the rest of the world was also done fighting.  

Issues: - Orders from Higher did not materialize.  This left us with no tasks, and no end state.  Did not even get peacetime orders for training, security, or Rules of Engagement.  Most of our issues stem from this lack of direction.  Without a reason to push out, we stayed near camp.
Very reminiscent of NATO at EW1.  Both times, despite claims to the contrary, we could find no trace of enemy activities except when they hit our camp/built up sites.

-Our defenses hinged on our rapid deployment from the barn to counter NATO.  This left us reacting to NATO, which was undesirable, but fit best with my understanding of a NVA detachment’s reaction to a surprise war.  A war that left us defending, rather than attacking.
-Without orders to the contrary we pursued this Operational concept for several days.
-We also failed to perform well.  Arriving late /due to distance/ several times.  And once failing to respond at all !  I was left asleep, during an entire attack on the Soviet camp, and then our guard abandoned its post and went to sleep. Leaving us defenseless!

-Towards the end of the week I discovered, some sleeping bags were not quite warm enough for all weather operations.  Very few were waterproof, especially in stormy weather.  We could have made it, however no one but Stagg had really tried it out before hand. Right? So we would have been learning tough lessons at Eastwind, when I could not afford another sick trooper.

-Why does the event always end just as I am leaving on a combat patrol? A joke.  The war always seems to start when I am out of camp or on patrol, so it all evens out.

-Stagg didn't take very good notes for later use and review.
-Nor did he issue written orders.  This was partially due to our ad-hock nature this year.   

Fixes:
Orders: Obviously we need them.  At least something to get start.  Swayze and Tascabe know.  I’m positive they’ll fix it.

Defensive/dull plans:  Well this is a game. In hindsight I should have been more aggressive in our patrols.  Next time I will be.
In the future my troops’ and camp’s defenses will be based on more patrolling forward.  If we can find the enemies avenues of approach, and react farther out we should be safer anyway.
Personally I've realized that I like patrolling, and I intend to be out more, unless I get a job that requires me to stay back. (That as usual is up to Swayze and Tascabe)

Equipment in general, but especially sleeping bags, and waterproof covers need to be tested before hand.  This is especially true when using EastBloc methods for waterproofing. Zeltbahns work great, I’ve used one with my wool blanket at a fieldcraft weekend.  I woke up with a pool of water on top of me, with just a silicone application on my zelt.
That success was based on a school of hard knocks where my zeltbahn failed to work perfectly.
At EW3 we had several people with substandard zeltbahns. As a leader I can't take that risk, without a really good reason.
Next year we will have to be more prepared.  Both personally and as a unit.
I will rewrite the gear requirements to include an actual waterproof zeltbahn.  There is some extra fluff in the requirements list anyway.  So a rewrite is no big deal.

-Next year we will need to be more prepared.  Especially the commander, who is going to issue written orders whenever possible and keep a log of activities so he can accurately report himself to the party.


Some of these items are in the EastBloc List also.  They are here also to specifically address NVA actions.

Sustain:
-Forward operations.  The barn was a simple and safe proof of this operation. Next year we will do it in the woods, we have plenty of good Eastbloc ways to sleep in the woods and stay warm and dry.  We’ve tried ‘em.  
-Heating C-rations in the field.  Goes hand in hand with the above.
-Feeding by squad.  This is a distinguishing EastBloc method of feeding troops, and is /very/ cost effective since we can save the food if A-rations make it forward.



Improve:
-We must get our act together! Not manning 24 guard on Wed-Fri night could easily have cost us.
-Standardized watch methods for the NVA forces. Some of this will be solved in the future by collocating with other Warsaw pact Forces operating in the area.  But I was making up most of the guard shifts and methods on the fly.  In the future more planning is needed.
-Dividing our Forces.  Maintaining and guarding two camps strained our ability to patrol the border more aggressively.
-Not being prepared for the large(er) amount of patrolling required this year.  Next year everyone is going to have to realize that walking is built into Eastwind.
Cameron and I walked several patrols, over 3km a day at EWII.  
That was a smaller field.  This time around it required a 2 click hike just to get across the field in a straight line, let alone meander around.
Unless the fields get smaller we are going to be walking.  Expect it.
PB operations will help shorten the distance but we are going to be walking around with our gear at EW4.  Our Plan to go riding about in the BTR, failed us this time.  Next year we are going to plan like there are zero vehicles.  If by chance we get some wheels then our lives will be easier, and if not then we came prepared.

Its been said before
-correct expectations are the most important thing to bring to Eastwind.-
If we have that then we will end up bringing the right equipment, mindset and leave with happy memories.
(or PTSD for Misha)





« Last Edit: April 08, 2010, 03:15:33 pm by Stagg » Logged

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« Reply #1 on: April 08, 2010, 08:50:31 am »

I expect all of the NVA troops to add their views to this.  
I look forward to your feedback on my leadership, our missions/my planning, and our performance as a unit.

I also look forward to similar input from our "Soviet Friends."

Thank you in Advance....
« Last Edit: April 08, 2010, 11:55:50 am by Stagg » Logged

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« Reply #2 on: April 08, 2010, 12:15:25 pm »

My main issues this year were few. It was my first year, my sleeping bag was not addequet, and niether where my boots. Other than that I thought it went fairly well. Although freaking out in the middle of the night and running back to the barn was not my most admirable moment.
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« Reply #3 on: April 08, 2010, 03:32:28 pm »

Zack your main issues are fixable.... matter of fact you blended right in with all the rest of the more experience players who have been doing this for years.
As for your trip back to the barn.  I'm not sure that was so bad.

Over this coming year we can/will help you get a better sleeping bag, they can be had for 25-3oish dollars.  And we will have to get you into a good pair of boots.
I also highly recommend a cot, since we will not always have a pimp barn to sleep in.

Otherwise you were first class.  I hope to share the field with you again.


If your actions at the barn really bug you, then lets discuss 'em. 
For starters where were you patrolling? and what had I explained in your orders to be my expectations? I was probably pretty vague...
This will give us a good base.

After that why head back to the barn?  Any reason is a pretty good reason; as long as you had one.
Regardless, communication would be a good reason to be near the barn during a battle...

We can try to figure out "better" reasons... but all that is in hindsight.  Although it does help to learn for next time.
Worst case just remember that good judgment is often based on bad decisions Grin  And I say that from experience! 
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« Reply #4 on: April 08, 2010, 04:06:15 pm »

Well I was supposted to patrol some sort of circle around ou AO. My half asleep self believed it was time for our late lunch. I got my orders strait and set out on my patrol. It was right about midnight and dark as hell when I started walking toward the border from the barn. My plan was to walk from the barn to the border to infront of behive and come around the back side of our hill. a few minutes in to my patrol however I started hearing noises from the direction of the border. All of the sudden a flare went off, then another and pretty soon the noises I heard turned into yelling. Not knowing what in the world was going on I ran back to the barn to inform Tom, who was on gaurd in the barn, the stituation. I was told later that I was freaking out and got up the ladder before they even got the wood out of the way.

And thats how it went.
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« Reply #5 on: April 08, 2010, 05:12:15 pm »

Ok so that sounds a little hasty.  But then again your job was to wander around outside... looking for trouble.
If you found trouble, zip back to the barn and warn us so we could respond.
That part is good.

Now coming back as a crazed nut?
Thats not very good form old chap.  But we will all cut you some slack since this was your first time to Eastwind, and if I'm told correctly your first real (crazy) airsoft event.
Nothing a little night time experience can't fix, and you already have some of that from EW3.

If you don't believe me just ask the East German border Guards from EW1.  Or some (mercifully) unnamed Soviet troopers from our training events in past years.
Nigh operations are difficult and often spooky... especially when on your first night patrol, by yourself in front of obvious activity, and during on of the Darkest nights of the event.

Now the room for improvement:
-Get more info before un-assing (moving out).  We needed you to come back and warn us with info, not stories of horror.  All it usually takes is a few minutes of hiding in the bushes where nobody can see you anyway.
-Numbers of bodies is a start, although hard to get in the dark.  
-Uniform type(s) At least friendly or enemy.
-What are they doing.  If possible
-and What equipment do they have. are they bringing anything interesting with them?


We EastBloc soldiers have a handy little report form, to remember, fill out, and bring back.  Its called "STOLI" and its a big reason why we all should carry a little notebook with us at all times.
It means:
S-Size.  Of the enemy
T-Time.  Of the observation, you never know when you will actually get the info back to higher command. so a time you saw the enemy is useful.
O-Observation.  What did you see the enemy doing? holding? or Carrying? What where they wearing?
L-Location.  Where? preferably in grid-coordinates, but whatever you have will do.
I-Intent.  Your intentions.  What are you going to do next?  this last bit is not needed if you report your info in person since the CO can discuss the next step with you. But Intent(I) is important if you are sending info over the radio and need to update your plan.

----------------
Just for grins the NATO guys use a SALUTE report which works much the same way

Size (S) of the enemy
Activity (A)of the enemy
Location (L) of the enemy
Uniform (U) of the enemy
Time (T) of observation
Equipment (E) used by the enemy

-----------------

These both work well for getting ALL the useful information back in a logical order.  Both are especially useful when transmitting over a radio, since you can send info like:

"Line Serria, seven"
"Line Tango, 2130hrs"
"Line Oscar, American Uniforms, with M16s, and stick horses"
"Line Lima, Main creek crossing."
"Line India, remain in OP/LP and report... and giggle at stick horses"

I've used the phonetic alphabet, but if you can't remember you could just use regular letters, or the numbers 1-5.  This allows the receiver to write down your information in a quick useful manner, rather than writing a whole paragraph of gibberish.  


After spending a week in the field with you, I would gladly do so again.  And I am sure you will do better next time, since you will be all the wiser for the first effort.
« Last Edit: April 08, 2010, 05:16:07 pm by Stagg » Logged

The voices in my head may not be real, but they have some cool ideas!

Always carry two trauma kits.
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« Reply #6 on: April 08, 2010, 05:24:18 pm »

Now that I think of it the real problem was that with enemy crossing the border.... you all left me /the Commander/ asleep!
Then when the report turned out to be true, you still left me asleep!

I'm glad we all survived to learn from our mistake, but lets not EVER repeat that performance.

For my part I will leave more detailed instructions before retiring (or leaving) so you can make an informed decision.  But even if I have a "do not disturb" sign... wake me up when the enemy is around.
The last thing I need is to be awoke and told that the enemy is literally at the gate.  Remember that all commanders need some time to think and actually make decisions.  So wake them up a little early when needed.  After all that is what they signed up for Shocked
« Last Edit: April 08, 2010, 05:25:53 pm by Stagg » Logged

The voices in my head may not be real, but they have some cool ideas!

Always carry two trauma kits.
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« Reply #7 on: April 08, 2010, 05:37:25 pm »

just officially, nato didnt have any stick horses in this event
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« Reply #8 on: April 08, 2010, 06:04:02 pm »

"-We were also informed that NATO had raided our barn and captured our BTR Driver (Coyote).  Not willing to leave him in the hands of the enemy, who may not return him for months after a ceasefire, we decided to mount a rescue."

yeah, he got to go eat a DOUBLE bacon cheeze burger and watch college basketball on tv,,,what a horrible experience!
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« Reply #9 on: April 08, 2010, 07:02:43 pm »

"-We were also informed that NATO had raided our barn and captured our BTR Driver (Coyote).  Not willing to leave him in the hands of the enemy, who may not return him for months after a ceasefire, we decided to mount a rescue."

yeah, he got to go eat a DOUBLE bacon cheeze burger and watch college basketball on tv,,,what a horrible experience!

Think of the heartburn risk, the artery clogging cholesterol and the damage that the grease would impose on his GI tract.
That second part - watching BB - ever would be punishment to me Wink
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« Reply #10 on: April 08, 2010, 07:39:56 pm »

I don't think you had any 7 man patrols either... I was merely making a joke so somebody would remember the lesson.  Besides you never know.  Nobody believed the KCAA had a minigun... but then we have pictures to prove it.  Roll Eyes


One of the things we are going to have to work on is getting everyone on the same page at the actual EW games.
Zack (Rebel Guerrilla) was squared away to be sure, but had not gotten any opportunities to learn even basic warrior stuff like unit formations, IMT, hand signals, or concepts that we all take for granted.

Next year we will need to actually get camp setup NLT Sat. so we have Sunday, Monday, and whenever, as a make up time for people to have the opportunity of getting up to speed.
It would have been a good excuse to get out on the field (and will be next time)

Same should have been true for the BTR, except the cold killed the puny batteries that were in it.  We couldn't get it back to life until the camp was setup, Brett found time, and a gen-set could be set aside to recharge the batteries.
If the planets don't line up just right those three rarely happen... we got lucky that it was a quick fix, but it really put a damper on our BTR training.  I had planned to use the roads around the AO to our Alternate training site at "Hungry Mother" park to train on, but that required a vehicle and driver.
Next year we will just have to do our PMCS beforehand, or else we might be the ones on Stick horses!


*For the clueless:
IMT. Individual movement technique
AO.  Area of Operation
PMCS.  Preventative Maintenance Checks and Services
« Last Edit: April 08, 2010, 07:46:18 pm by Stagg » Logged

The voices in my head may not be real, but they have some cool ideas!

Always carry two trauma kits.
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« Reply #11 on: April 08, 2010, 08:18:25 pm »

While this fix action applies to more than this one AAR and will be further developed and posted at a later date, I will share my plan/goal for vehicles.

My plan/goal for my vehicles at EW is this:

A vehicle will be assigned to a person/crew  - ie Steve and Cameron as BTR crew.  They will be fully trained on the vehicle and responsible for a thorough pre-deployment PMCS. This does not mean paying for parts etc but checking things and helping in their repair if necessary so they learn more about the vehicle. During the event - the vehicle is under their control and is their responsibility. They need to make sure it has fuel - request resupply as necessary. They make sure that all systems are maintained in an operational state. They do the daily PMCS needed to keep them that way.

This is how the real military does this and it works so why not for us?

Obviously I would like for those people to treat my vehicles with more care than most soldiers/airmen/sailors and marines treat their equipment but the basic plan is the same.

This means some buy-in from those vehicle crews in terms of per-EastWind time and labor. That is the price  of being assigned a cool vehicle in the field though Wink

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« Reply #12 on: April 09, 2010, 07:26:24 am »

I like it.  That way a whole Unit doesn't depend on you to make their vehicles move.
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The voices in my head may not be real, but they have some cool ideas!

Always carry two trauma kits.
One to induce trauma, and one to reduce trauma.
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