Pages: [1] 2 3 ... 6   Go Down
Print
Author Topic: Operation Eastwind 8 AAR  (Read 25453 times)
Stagg
Global Moderator
Knows what he's talking about...
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 1866


Plays East Wind every day!


« on: March 13, 2015, 07:47:04 pm »

There is much to say, and no time for me to say it.
I am deliriously sleepy, and packing to leave for NTC tomorrow (Sat, the last day of EW)

1st Squad, you made me proud.  I look forward to working with you in the future!

Post away.  Lets not wait until next year to get those AARs typed up and published.
« Last Edit: March 13, 2015, 07:49:17 pm by Stagg » Logged

The voices in my head may not be real, but they have some cool ideas!

Always carry two trauma kits.
One to induce trauma, and one to reduce trauma.
Arbee
Recruit
*
Offline Offline

Posts: 43


Reportersoft


WWW
« Reply #1 on: March 15, 2015, 09:46:34 am »

Dom and I just got home about three hours ago, and I'm uploading the pictures I took right now.  Not all of them are going to be spectacular and there may be a few that are redundant, but as I told you guys at the event, my motto is "when in doubt, shoot."  I got rid of most of the ones that are way overexposed, underexposed, or too blurry to make out, but the rest of them I'll be posting to my Imgur gallery untouched.

Also as I said, once I get the link up on the forums, the pictures are essentially yours.  I don't charge, there's no copyright, you're free to take them and use them as you please.  All I ask is a little bit of credit if someone asks where you got them from, haha.

I'm still in the process of typing out my full AAR, which I have the rest of the week to do and which will be ready once I'm done.  I'm going to have to go through the notes of the other reporter you guys had with you, since he seems to have mysteriously disappeared after, if I've got this right, asking to borrow the NATO commander's knife to spread peanut butter on some crackers.

All kidding aside, I had a blast this past week.  I've never quite experienced anything like that before, and I'm kind of surprised that I made it through the event at all, given that I couldn't survive a week at the beach with my family, let alone a week in the company of complete strangers in the middle of nowhere in Oklahoma.  I learned a lot, which is always a good thing, and I enjoyed tagging along with those of you who would have me.  I especially appreciate the admins allowing me to come out on such short notice, so thank you, guys.

To US 1st and 2nd squads, a special shout-out:  Thanks for tolerating my presence in your tent, and for not attempting to deflate me to see if it would stop the snoring.  You guys are the tops.
Logged
Spectre
Recruit
*
Offline Offline

Posts: 30


« Reply #2 on: March 16, 2015, 09:17:23 am »

Wow.

After putting my my brains back in my head a little I think I may finally be able to assemble some cohesive thoughts. I was very truly impressed by this event. I thought after 5 years i may have been hyping it up into something it wasn't I was wrong. Somehow you guys were able to simulate war in a way even the army fails to do. Such attention to detail in so many ways. The command staff was amazing. The players impressed me. Even the civilians put me to shame sometimes. I met a lot of awesome people and hopefully made a few friends (love me!).

Swayze: You are a brilliant madman.

Mercy: Best XO ever. I honestly couldn't even tell you who most of my past XOs are in the real world. Thank you for toelerating my bullsh*t.

Switzer: Making intel fun since 1992.

Shaefer: You were an amazing sergeant major. Second only to maybe Sam Elliot. You put the fear into quite a few soldiers.

Trucker: You're a pretty cool dude with a lot of amusing anecdotes. I also wasn't aware the ambulance had a warp drive.

Stagg: excellent leader and NCO. I'm pretty sure you are a machine.

1st squad: You guys were awesome. We got our bugs worked out fast (except for patch to the road) and we fought well.

The only improvements I have for the event are for myself. Rainsuit would have been a good idea. New(er) boots as well. Aslo, being the only grunger it seems, I should have packed more of this:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6JA25BIxgtk
 

Logged
Mercy
Global Moderator
Knows what he's talking about...
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 1253


Army # 24172366


« Reply #3 on: March 16, 2015, 11:21:00 am »

Great times everyone!  I'm finally home, and am constructing a lengthy AAR for all the subtext that was happening in the background so that the HQ could play too.  Unfortunately, I think it will be in statement format  Grin

It was a true privilege to have the opportunity to run the EW Company.  It was a pleasure to play with folks who really wanted to be there...unlike some events where half the players act like it's a burden to do the job.  Your collective good humor and professional approach to the game and the missions made this the most engaging and rewarding event I've ever been to...and I've been to a lot of them.  EW may be over and I realized when I was driving home how depressed that made me feel but boy oh boy do I have some awesome memories of these events and more importantly I have met some of the finest people from around the country.   Thank you all, especially Allan and Brett the two evil geniuses behind all this.  

Edit to add:
Pulling pictures off my phone and this is my favorite so far:
« Last Edit: March 16, 2015, 04:19:11 pm by Mercy » Logged

There's an east wind coming, such a wind as never blew on England yet. It will be cold and bitter and a good many of us may wither before its blast. But it's God's own wind none the less, and a cleaner, better, stronger land will lie in the sunshine when the storm has cleared.
aswayze
Admin
Knows what he's talking about...
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 5556


« Reply #4 on: March 17, 2015, 05:08:26 am »

Obviously there are a million things to say and no time to say them. 

It has been a crazy ride over the years and I feel that this year was a fitting end to it all. 

A well earned and hearty thank you to all who have contributed to make this last East Wind the best it could possibly be. 


Logged
Exarach
You might want to listen up...
****
Offline Offline

Posts: 273



« Reply #5 on: March 17, 2015, 07:31:46 am »

Obviously there are a million things to say and no time to say them. 

It has been a crazy ride over the years and I feel that this year was a fitting end to it all. 

A well earned and hearty thank you to all who have contributed to make this last East Wind the best it could possibly be. 




Logged

"Friendly Fire Isn't"
Doorman
Knows what he's talking about...
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 1325



« Reply #6 on: March 17, 2015, 08:33:51 am »

Working on my AAR as well but the whole drive home after my books-on-tape of "The Hunt for Red October" finished I asked myself.

Logged

Berufssoldat des wahren Nationalen Volksarmee der Deutschen Demokratischen Republik im Ostwind
RayBz
Recruit
*
Offline Offline

Posts: 29


« Reply #7 on: March 17, 2015, 02:03:39 pm »

College stuff is hampering my free time so I'll post a full AAR Later.

First and foremost I apologize for my idiocy over the course of the week (particularly to the CSM for doing things that in retrospect was pretty stupid of me to do). 1st and 3rd squad were a solid group of guys to work with, even though I was a cold weather casualty in my first day (sorry for that). Props to the rest of the NATO troops and also the Warsaw pact guys, solid effort. All in all, East Wind was what I expected and more and I would be happy to participate in events any of you guys are creating.

Also, picture of the helmet everyone but both Stagg's, Dirtpro, and Gallion signed


Finally, these words shall forever come up in my head when I'm trying to unfuck myself over things...

"This ain't Vietnam, Batubara!" - CSM Schaffer
Logged
Mercy
Global Moderator
Knows what he's talking about...
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 1253


Army # 24172366


« Reply #8 on: March 18, 2015, 08:31:17 am »

For the purposes of the story I'm expanding the individual days we actually spent at EW to cover the course of a couple of weeks where 12-24 hours might represent multiple days.

Interview/statement of Lt. M (court ID # 082172) from Her Majesty's Military Prison - Colchester regarding events over the course of several weeks in the aftermath of last year's global thermonuclear exchange.

Circumstances: Upheaval in chain of command, small isolated units under localized command.  Investigation into corrupt command influence.

Interviewer LT. Col D (court ID # 083117):  Let's start at the beginning, how did you come to be with a US Radio Relay unit?

Lt. M: I was seconded to the unit for a two year exchange term.  When the Flash happened I'd been working there a little over 1 year, 7 months.

Interviewer: And how did you find Capt. S (court ID # 087632)

Lt. M: Extremely competent and concerned with the welfare and capability of his troops. I very much trusted his abilities.

Lt. Col D: Tell me about the weeks immediately after the Flash.

Lt. M: Like everyone else we were trying to determine what and who had survived and gather resources and personnel in the pre-planned collection points, with the plan being that once we did that we'd move out and join with larger units.

Lt. Col D: And the civilian reporter, A (court ID # 6351952) that was with the unit?  

Lt. M: He had been assigned prior to the Flash some kind of young reporter looking to get into the war.  He was nominally attached to US 2nd squad but I'd advised him that if he discussed it with any of the section sergeants and they agreed he was free to go on any mission with any unit in our laager area.

Lt. Col D: Describe the events in the weeks following the Flash.

Lt. M: We were running standard patrolling missions trying to locate enemy forces and determine what if, any supplies were in the area.  Highly mobile patrols were easy pickings for the enemy and we'd been told to avoid contact with WARPAC forces where possible so it had the lads in a frame of mind that was getting people killed.  However, the patrol reports indicated that the enemy intended to fight a guerrilla action using hit and run techniques to bleed us dry.  To that end I started ordering patrols that would freeze portions of the AO and begin channelizing the enemy into kill boxes.  I also hoped the effect was to dissuade them from engaging us.  I recall using the phrase we just want to keep them off of us until we gather enough supplies to move out of this AO.  So we responded like any other anti-insurgency operation with area denial responses while we searched for supplies.

On one of the evenings prior to this shift in tactics the reporter, A, was sitting in with the Security Alert Team and made a comment that this duty should be called SIT team rather than SAT team. I made some comment in passing that this was just the way we liked it and that to wish for action was bad luck.  Less than one minute later one of the teams in the field reported they were in contact and the SAT team was bombing out to respond.  

Later when everything had settled down, and the SAT team had returned Sergeant Major S (court ID# 07356) told the reporter in no uncertain terms that he didn't get to talk any more.  I then explained to the reporter that soldiers are quite superstitious, and with good reason.  More to the point it is not wise to dismiss it as foolishness regardless of personal beliefs.  Further that every time someone complains of slow SAT duty historically something kicks off, every time.  He must remember that his wish for action means people are dying.  In this case three troopers were killed and that if the troops in camp felt that he wanted them to get killed or injured for the benefit of some newspaper story he would not be making any friends there.  I dubbed him cloverleaf to off-set any potential for the lads to gift him with a less flattering nickname and avoid a morale issue with someone viewed as "unlucky" tagging along with the sections.  As it was, I believe that some sections did not ever have him on patrol with them due to this.

Capt. S had taken the report of the incident with rather less grace and it became a bit of a pass-time for him to mock the reporter and we joined in.  For no reason I can explain now we all felt that his utterance of the fateful words had caused those deaths and began a campaign of ignoring him as much as possible.  

Our primary patrols were resourcing and checking the only major bridge in our AO noted on our maps.  I very much needed to know if the bridge was capable of vehicle traffic since it was looking like it was the only intact bridge in our AO that would allow us to move west.  Two previous patrols to the bridge for this purpose were unsuccessful in getting eyes on the decking plates and super-structure but did confirm that some of the bridge was still standing.  A third patrol finally confirmed that the decking plates were intact but that there was also a military ambulance crashed on the bridge with bodies inside.  Extra motor transport seemed too good to pass up so we began to plan a maximum effort recovery of the vehicle and the bodies which, while not confirmed, were assumed to be friendly forces.  

The plan was to move the Company on-line and skirmish through the remains of Cottbus under a small barrage of supporting mortar fire; 2 tubes 10 rounds each; bringing as much recovery equipment as we could conveniently carry to effect any repairs on the damaged vehicle and return it to our field camp.  Our withdrawal was to be screened with the deployment of CS gas if wind and weather allowed.

I quickly produced a Company Operations Order to this effect and units then produced their orders extracts and we launched the mission on time that night.  All went well except that a small scout unit that was frago'd over radio comms to support the right flank was hit while moving and sustained 100% casualties.  We'd recovered the ambulance and two bodies of friendly troops and while I was on the site I went under the bridge and thoroughly inspected it for damage and confirmed that it could be used by our entire force for our move.

Over the course of the next few days our shift in tactics started showing results and we'd reeled in three East German prisoners.  I stepped into the TOC for the third interview which I was advised was suspected to be the patrol leader.  Standard pressure techniques were used, invasion of personal space, limiting his fidgeting and looking around, flat hands and the additional usual stressors.  We tag team interviewed him and when my turn came I asked general questions regarding numbers of troops and dispositions.   Early in my portion of the interrogation the Captain pulled a knife out and sat down with the prisoner and followed by the Sergeant Major drawing his sidearm and pointing it at the prisoner.  I immediately asked them both to give me a minute with the prisoner as a way to get them to back off.  That escalation was too much, however, and most unfortunately the reporter was there snapping away and got a rather unflattering picture of the Sergeant Major pointing a pistol at the subject.  We all knew that the subject was never in any real danger at that point and that the picture might well prove unnecessarily compromising for all involved.  I'd mentioned to the Captain that we might just suggest to the reporter that such a picture could be easily misunderstood and we'd much prefer if he deleted that particular shot. He agreed and said he already had a plan for dealing with it.

Captain S and I loaded the prisoners on a vehicle and the reporter tagged along.  We dropped the prisoners with the nearby 287th MP Coy.  While we were there the Captain told me that we'd be giving the reporter a bit of a fright to delete this picture, while it seemed the long way round from just asking I admit I was not opposed to scaring him a bit in payback of the SAT incident.  I agreed but what I heard from the Captain as the event played out probably scared me as much as it scared the reporter.  

When we departed the MP Coy lines we drove to a secluded area with the reporter and asked him to leave his camera in the vehicle.  The man was immediately nervous and I don't blame him we both had holstered sidearms and he was unarmed.  The Captain started a quiet speech detailing the fact that after the Flash things were different, that he was in charge here and that compromising pictures were unappreciated.  More to the point, no one knew if he'd survived the Flash at all and it would be the work of a moment to be rid of him.  

I still felt the reporter was not in any real danger since the picture, while unflattering, was certainly easily explained away so I played along to the coercion.  The young man was a fool and naive but he had guts, he'd basically said that people have a right to know what was going on.  I figured the game was up and simply walked back to the vehicle and started it, knowing he would interpret this action in the worst way.  He did and agreed to delete the photograph.  

I was discomfited by the Captain's little speech, it showed a bit of insight into his approach that was potentially unsavory.  Over the next few days phrases like "loyal troops" crept into his vocabulary and a man who previously would happily dine on gravel to ensure his troops ate steak began manufacturing petty orders to send troopers away from their hot coffee so that he could drink it himself, stealing personal property from EPWs and other little things like that.

Operations continued apace and we were collecting everything of military value to facilitate the move to join with larger forces.  We got a report of a massive force composed of units of the Russian 3rd Shock Army slaughtering their way across Germany, attacking East Germans, other Soviet formations, non-ethnic Russians, NATO forces and pretty much anything else in their path.  To us it sounded like a bid to carve out fiefdom by some Russian General.

The farthest city from our AO that might offer supplies was Neuhausen-Spree so we began a series of long range patrols which would tell us particularly if fuel was available in the vicinity.  To that end the jumping off point began to be fortified so that units could exist mostly out of the weather in the interim.   Capt. S began talking more and more about fortifying Cottbus and staying put and less and less about moving out of the AO as soon as possible.  I began to see uncomfortable parallels in our own preparations of Cottbus with the actions of 3rd Shock.

Somewhere along the way I'd decided that we should possibly be trying to make contact with the East Germans since it would be much preferable to have, if not their cooperation, then their tacit agreement that none of us wanted to be in the way of the oncoming 3rd Shock Army given the circumstances.  I didn't expect nor necessarily want to combine forces just an assurance that we could use the bridge we'd designated Hendrix to withdraw west without being attacked by them and they would of course be welcome to stay and wait for the massive Army should the mood take them but we'd like to be away.  

I'd not breathed a word of this to anyone on the HQ staff especially not the Captain though I did mention that some way had to be found to get through the small force blocking us without taking casualties and that they probably weren't any happier to hear about the activities of the 3rd Shock than we were.  The Captain and I went forward to Cottbus to check on the troops that had been reinforcing the area in anticipation of stepping off from there to N.-Spree.  Constant reports of an LP/OP just beyond Cottbus apparently manned by East Germans gave me some hope of spotting one of them and waiving them over for a bit of a chat.  I'd told the patrols to ignore these LP/OPs as long as they didn't make a nuisance of themselves but to maintain active patrols so that no larger forces would strike them in Cottbus.  I separated myself from the Captain and went forward to try to make contact.  I was acting without orders of course so I thought it best to ask forgiveness rather than permission since I was fairly certain he had no such aim at the time.  

The OP was apparently unmanned or I just didn't get close enough to it to be spotted when I spied one of our patrols in near proximity and scuttled myself out of their way and back into Cottbus proper.  The Captain and I shortly left Cottbus and began a meandering trip back to the field camp. First he asked if we should go back up to a known minefield to inspect it, of course I declined saying neither of us were engineers and asked what purpose there was in  returning to a minefield we'd both been happy to avoid the first time we'd located it.  I was quite uncertain as to the reason we were so far afield and knew that he couldn't possibly know what I'd been up to but my guilty conscience was working double time.  He never brought up what was on his mind nor why he was interested in going back to a minefield nor why we were so far off the route to the field camp but I was nervous.  

I could see all our activity moving towards a decision point wherein we'd either find what we needed to move out in N.-Spree and hopefully slip by the WARPAC forces in the AO if we couldn't "accidentally" make contact.  The Captain was insisting on more and more troops in Cottbus and effectively separating them from HQ C&C as he would allow none of us to move forward into Cottbus to form a jump TOC.

One morning he went forward with SAT as a bodyguard at some point and I took the leap from the lion's head while it was just senior staff in the TOC and apparently the reporter sitting unobtrusively in the corner badgering away on his typewriter. We'd gotten so used to having him around no one really noticed him anymore.   I broached the subject of possibly getting in contact with the East Germans and trying to come to some sort of accommodation with them in light of the threat the rogue 3rd Shock Army troops posed to us all.  To my relief none of the Officers or Senior NCOs disagreed.  The idea of sitting around a shelled town between two enemy forces was not a desirable course of action.  Someone suggested leaving a note on their most heavily traveled route to the effect that we'd like to discuss with their leadership some mutually beneficial courses of action.  We discussed at some length the odd orders, increasing paranoia and references to setting up long term in Cottbus.  While we were making a plan to circumvent the Captain I pointed out that what we were discussing was in fact mutiny and that we would all possibly answer for it if we were wrong about his intentions.  

None of us were enthusiastic about this course but it got very quiet as we considered alternatives.  Reporter A could not have missed any of this conversation regarding our concerns of Capt. S's increasingly irrational orders.  We'd steadily defended his intentions to the troops but among ourselves there was a definite feeling of disquiet.   Even so I wasn't sure of the staff just as I'm sure they weren't sure of me; how to fulfill our strategic orders while still doing our duty at the local level?  For the moment the long range patrolling to N.-Spree aligned with the need to gather enough fuel to move the Company to a link-up point so the build-up in Cottbus for that purpose continued just hoping I could undo that fortification/build-up when the decision point to move had been reached.

Shortly after the Captain returned he burst into the TOC and announced that he had a perfect way to contact the WARPAC forces, he'd send a note.  We were suddenly relieved, he'd finally come to the same conclusion that we'd need to neutralize the threat of the local forces by cooperating with them, at least to the extent we could pass their lines.  Those hopes were shattered shortly after, as we sat there hopeful, he composed a letter to the WARPAC forces.  He handed it directly to Lt. B (court ID # 085691) who proceeded to type it up.  He then handed it over to me to translate into German.  As I read it my heart sank, it was pure madness.

"All soldiers regardless of previous affiliation are ordered to report to the church in Cottbus for induction.  You will be fed, you will be paid, you will serve.  Proceed in parade order down RT 15 with this reporter 100m in front of your column.  You must not deviate from RT15 for your own safety. You have until 1400L to comply."

He then started soliciting those present for a new grand title he should call himself to make sure everyone knew he was important.   There were some desultory suggestions.  When he asked me directly such that I had to answer I told him "Since you seem to be granting yourself a new title I suppose you're the one that has to like it."   I left the TOC to handle some inconsequential piece of business and when I returned he'd named himself Bishop of Cottbus.  So now he was calling himself Bishop of Cottbus and some of the US troops were already addressing him as your Holiness.   Not, I now believe, because they agreed with what was happening but because it was just easier than inciting his wrath.  I also noted him talking privately with the West German section leader and felt sure that the words "loyal troops" were being used with frequency and I was equally certain that no longer included me.  

The SM approached me as we were about some errand or other and innocently related an historical footnote to me.  He said, "You know Canadian troops invented fragging Officers in WWI when stupid English Officers would continually volunteer them for suicide missions."  In retrospect I believe it was his way of saying that he was just as aware that the Captain had lost the plot and he was on-side.  At the time though, I took it as a warning that I might be exceeding my bounds with him.

Some circumspect commentary occurred in the TOC regarding this letter the WARPAC forces and his naming himself Bishop.  Reporter A could not have failed to hear any of this nor failed to note our discomfiture and yet during some briefing or other he was chatting up the SAT team when the Captain overheard him mention that he'd contacted an East German patrol and gotten some pictures of them.  The Captain exploded, he charged across the TOC and drawing his pistol demanded to know what kind of traitor Reporter A was.  I tried to throw the fool a verbal cue and told the Captain of course there would be more than one reporter in the AO and hoped the reporter was a clever fellow.  The SM tried to deflect it as well but under a barrage of shouting and demanding answers he went down like a house of cards and said that there was no other reporter he'd gone on a patrol with East Germans.    

The Captain demanded we take A outside and figure out what he'd told the WARPAC forces.  The SM and I both snapped to with all dispatch simply to get the poor fool out of sight of the Captain as quickly as possible.  Lt. B followed us presumably in his position as S2.  

I couldn't believe how stupid this reporter was, he'd been party to our conversations regarding the Captain's increasing paranoia, our desire to contact the East Germans which he was clearly able to do much more safely than any of us and chillingly we realized he had also overheard our mutinous conversations and comments over the past few days.  How could he possibly have missed the fact that the Captain was clearly under stress and was not making good decisions? Reporter A was apologizing and weeping.  Lt. B said something to the effect that "It was too late now." I was shocked and suddenly not sure where he stood in relation to the Captain. I told Lt. B to report to the Captain that Reporter A had simply snapped a few pictures and had not, in fact, told the enemy anything.  This followed up with a fair smattering of berating the idiot for being so careless.  The horse shit was getting deeper with no sign of a pony anywhere in sight.

The Sergeant Major agreed that he was quite stupid to talk about anything to do with the enemy especially since the reporter must know that declaring oneself a bishop of a bombed out town in post-apocalypse Europe isn't really cricket.  I snapped at the Sergeant Major, "Stupidity is still not a crime Sergeant Major, and certainly not a death sentence."  Suddenly the Captain appeared out of the TOC, carrying no sidearm.  I was slightly relieved and as he approached I called out that reporter A had told the WARPAC nothing.
Captain S suddenly drew a knife and I went for my pistol and the Sergeant Major instantly mirrored me and suddenly I wasn't sure of him, I thought immediately of the story of Canadian troops fragging English Officers in WWI and wondered.  Before we could blink again the Captain had cut the throat of the civilian.  I had a burning copper taste in my mouth as everything we thought we were fighting for and everything we stood for was burned to ash.  In that instant, we knew that we were not only damned but both against this mad-man and quite distressingly we were one other thing - witnesses.  

I had to suppress the immediate urge to shoot the Captain down, since compounding our inaction with murdering the Captain didn't seem like a solution.  We couldn't arrest him.  What purpose to arrest him since we couldn't be sure that the arrest would even last the distance of the walk to the TOC.  There were no MPs to turn him over to we'd lost contact with them some time over night and the bulk of the Company were US troops with no reason to take our word for it.  So for the moment it was just we two...no one else had witnessed this murder.  I was acutely aware of Emerson's admonition 'When you strike at the king you must kill him."  How to do this in this situation without becoming murderers ourselves?  As he stalked away, the Sergeant Major and I still frozen to our spots, the spell broke and we walked mutely toward the TOC.  As we moved in that direction we both detoured to the nearby hand washing station.  It was subconscious on both our parts but as we were actually washing our hands in that instant I remembered my Macbeth, "Will all the water in the ocean wash this blood from my hands? No, instead my hands will stain the seas scarlet, turning the green waters red."   "Sergeant Major, that was the most dishonourable act I've ever witnessed, I can't believe he did that."  The Sergeant Major agreed that he assumed he would just threaten the fool or make some speech which would show his intentions.  I agreed and my wishful thinking had doomed the poor bastard and us along with him. The Sergeant Major stated a need to go dry his hands over in the Canadians' tent.  I understood this to mean he was going to fully inform them and make sure they were on-side so that we wouldn't have another bout of indecision about each other that would lead to more deaths.  

In the meantime a squad had been in contact and suddenly the ambulance bombed out to collect a wounded East German prisoner.   Soon there was the Captain going out of his way to save the life of this East German, it was all so incongruous and after bandaging the man the Captain was coolly telling the S2 to scratch out "reporter" in his note and replace it with "ambulance".  He was going to send his mad note with back with the East German.

I began to avoid all but the Commonwealth troops.  At some point during the next day the Captain had left his sidearm on the supply table and Sergeant Major S hurriedly stripped it of as many rounds as possible in the short time he was away.  He relayed that he thought he'd been able to strip all but two or three rounds from the weapon.   I dryly noted that at least he'd left one for each of us.   We both discretely started wearing sidearms and armour at all times.  The Captain started wearing his pistol concealed up his sleeve.

We had a staff meeting that went into details on his plans for taking over a fish farm in the nearby area, farming cattle, taxing the local citizens and a host of other insanity.  At this point we were agreeing to any damn fool thing he suggested until we could figure out a way to derail this crazy train we'd found ourselves on.   Then a report came back that a refugee camp had been detected by one of the long range patrols and I immediately commented that we should just ignore them for the moment as we had no way to support them. The Captain commented that they might have supplies.  I stressed that we were not capable to taking care of refugees.  He said he viewed them as potential tax payers. Fortunately he didn't force the issue and seemed to forget about them though I've no doubt he would have come round to them again in time.

He went on to discuss just machine gunning the WARPAC troops en-mass when they arrived for the meeting, when he didn't get any cheers for that murderous scheme he didn't mention it again but it certainly played on my mind.  

As the appointed time for the meeting with the WARPAC troops approached the Captain spent more and more time with the isolated troops in Cottbus presumably coaching them to his way of thinking.  Then those troops still in the field camp were ordered to be in Cottbus in no less than 10 minutes.  I scrambled the troops that were on rest cycles and the balance of the HQ section and we rolled into Cottbus 10 minutes later.

The Captain immediately went to work on indoctrinating the incoming troops, telling them his requirement that they respond to any orders with a loud "Yes, your Holiness" as a ruse to give the WARPAC troops the impression that he was indisputably right and crazy so as to intimidate them.  I could clearly see it for what it was and if allowed to continue for a few days or weeks would become the new normal and so over time he would, in fact, become in people's minds the Bishop of Cottbus.   The non-US troops persisted in calling him Sir, while the US troops, not at all enthusiastically I hasten to point out, addressed him as his Holiness.  

I was certain that he stood alone by this time.  This was fairly well confirmed when US Sgt. L (Court ID #04609) approached SM S and asked him if what was happening was right.  The SM told him, "No son, it's not and I'm sure you'll know which way to jump when the time comes."  US Sgt SG (Court ID #053879) was also hesitant to the Captain's orders so he was likely to remain as professional as ever and react accordingly.  I'd seen the West German section edging away from the center of the position and slipping their HMG to a fighting position, I still wasn't sure what their intentions were but I also felt fairly confident they wouldn't over-react.  Sgt. M (court ID # 057213) was quite thoughtful and not given to rashness.

The Captain and I made the rounds of the position and as we walked along he cheerfully announced to me I would be named a Deacon in his church.   Before I could check myself I replied, "With respect Sir, you can go do one." I was prepared for a violent response but instead he laughed and said "Okay."  He felt pretty confident that he had the upper-hand, I felt like I had an unpleasant surprise waiting for him so we just circled each other and waited.

Some while later I happened to be speaking to Sgt. SG who told me that he'd heard I was a Deacon now.  I relayed to him my response to the Captain's suggestion.  He seemed to take it as a grand joke and said he'd spread that rumor any way.  

The WARPAC troops were now due to be coming into Cottbus and the Commonwealth would be there to greet them, no US troops nor West Germans; all the suspect fish in one barrel so to speak.   When they appeared I toyed with the idea of telling their Captain that ours had gone quite mad but that didn't seem like a plan with the potential to calm things down.  Better to get WARPAC troops distributed into the squads where some order could be maintained once the Captain had been blunted.  I felt confident that he was truly isolated now and once the threat of a giant standoff with the incoming WARPAC forces was put to rest we could arrest the Captain and withdraw in good order.  And about facing and marching off with WARPAC was also not on the cards since without motor transport the Captain would just run us down as deserters.

So I presented my compliments to the WARPAC Captain, introduced the Sergeant Major and we proceeded to march into Cottbus with the Canadian Section falling in behind.   As we turned the corner to head to the church there were US troops placed in each 2nd floor window of the church, and along the street leading to the church, a classic elevated L ambush.  As we approached the head of the street a smile flickered across the Captain's features and I halted the column before we marched into a killing box telling the SM to get these men distributed into the squads; I didn't add, "Where they'd be safer" but he understood probably before I did why that might be the case without my saying it.

Annoyed at our delay the Captain came up the street to us and ordered everyone into the church. As he was walking with us now it was unlikely any orders to fire would be given and so we all entered the church and racked most of our weapons.  There were still probably hundreds of grenades, a variety of pistols, and a fair few EG who thought no one noticed they'd kept their rifles, hiding them under their rain capes.  

The Sergeant Major had taken up position to the left of the Captain and had a pistol behind his back, not for the WARPAC but for the Captain, I was in a similar state of readiness and just hoped that the world wouldn't explode if our hands were forced.  There was no way we would allow him to give the order to massacre anyone.  I was distracted somewhat by a Russian who kept playing with a pouch, undoubtedly containing a grenade and I made sure he saw the error of his ways.  They might want to kill him but they'd have to damn well get in line and I wasn't about to let them kill any of us to do it.

The Captain described his plans to hold off a giant armoured column with the small contingent present and engineers were detailed to go and collect all the munitions and ordinance we'd been scattering around the field over the previous weeks trying to kill one another.  Units were detailed and orders were given and when I was detailed to return a squad to the field camp I made sure that the Commonwealth troops hadn't been detailed to engineer work.  At the field camp I loaded up with rations ostensibly to bring them forward into Cottbus and as the Captain and some of the WARPAC staff retired to the TOC the Commonwealth scouted a route and marched out of Cottbus. We couldn't save the others.

Postscript:
Prior to the event Allan and I discussed the potential for introducing corrupt command influence into the scenario.  He couldn't have more effectively delayed/altered some of my responses in game; he implied but never said I was part of the control group.  Only as the world developed did I find I was one of the lab mice and the chief target of the exercise.  I'd started suspecting that might be the case and the murder of the civilian completely burned my delusion down to the ground, as it was designed to do.  It was a masterful mouse trap and as I look back at the events leading up to it, those that are reflected in the story and some other events that, while significant, aren't worth noting for the flow of the story it was quite the primrose path.   Little pebbles become big rocks pretty quickly, like the early and subtle diminution of the civilian.  

Some things I admit I let run their course due to knowing some admin requirements, like the build-up in Cottbus but it is easy to assume that while things were happening for different reasons that my character would have seen some alignment with that course of action when the time came to undo the king.  We never got to play out the rest so of course the part where some few of us march off is completely made up since there is no way for me to predict any of the five or so outcomes I could think of based on the circumstances.  Some things are taken out of order so that they make sense in the flow of the story but I tried to accurately reflect my thoughts and intentions in character.  I did my very best to play it fairly only responding to things I knew or could find out within the structure of the game or known requirements and making assumptions based on being a LT from a foreign army mostly surrounded by US troops I also imply that there were a few more Commonwealth troops than just the Canadians and one lone UK Officer but I think no one will mind too much.  I also ascribed some sinister motivations where there were none, things like the proposed second trip to the mine field and the meandering jeep ride for instance, as well as some phantom US troops immediately on board with the Bishopric.  I've been slightly unfair to the troops actually there as you were all magnificent in fighting the war but for my own benefit to stay in character I again made some assumptions and ratcheted up my own paranoia level to accurately simulate weeks of stress.

Lest anyone think that Pete and I weren't playing the game fairly the incident where we washed our hands after the "murder" did actually happen, we felt that failure acutely.  It was a completely subconscious response to the event because prior to that point we'd not admitted to ourselves that the Captain S character had completely lost the plot.  And so regardless of our intentions my character certainly will be sitting in the Glasshouse awaiting Her Majesty's pleasure in the aftermath of WWIII.  Consequences are only slightly mitigated by intentions and it's sometimes important to be reminded that good intentions can still place you on the road to perdition.  It's not always easy to spot especially when survival is on the line.  I've placed my character on trial and while guilty of coercion and intimidation will probably not be held to accounts for conspiracy to murder and any planned mutiny would probably be mitigated by the fact that I was brassing up an insane man, so good news there then. Smiley

I've used the naming conventions used by the British military courts in sensitive trials to make it clear that the characters we inhabited only vaguely resembled the real people there since the internet can be a stupid place.  

Edit to fix a typo that was annoying me.
« Last Edit: April 28, 2015, 06:57:22 am by Mercy » Logged

There's an east wind coming, such a wind as never blew on England yet. It will be cold and bitter and a good many of us may wither before its blast. But it's God's own wind none the less, and a cleaner, better, stronger land will lie in the sunshine when the storm has cleared.
tascabe
WARPAC Admin
Admin
Knows what he's talking about...
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 3488


« Reply #9 on: March 18, 2015, 09:04:13 am »

Very good.

After talking to you and others I got a pretty good picture of the insanity that was unfolding on your side - but this helps piece it together as well.

There was no major change in the command stance on the WARPAC side - since from the beginning the Soviet model sets up the soldiers as expendable pawns and Commanders already have a heightened sense of wealth ;-)

Cleaning out malingerers and the like are sort of a normal thing in Soviet model armies - though usually the Dedi (soldiers that have server 18+ mos of their 24 mos service) do the dirty work instead of the Commander getting involved.

Logged
aswayze
Admin
Knows what he's talking about...
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 5556


« Reply #10 on: March 18, 2015, 10:35:34 am »

I had kind of a late start to the whole crazy plan and sort of had to play it by ear a bit.  I knew that I needed to be at least partially nutty to pull off the planned link up and movement across the Larsen property next door over to Grand Lake which was end of event plan A, but with Warpac losing their high mobility vehicle and then the weather going wet on us, it was quickly looking like we needed to divert over to a plan B. The odds of getting a convoy of vehicles across 5000 acres of forest and field without causing damage to the property were pretty slim and there's no reason to cause the neighboring rancher any heartache.

With the loss of plan A, plan B was to set up a fiefdom that leaned as closely as possible to a nice Jim Jones/Peoples Temple thing.   This was a particularly hard thing to pull off since I really had not had the time to truely recruit anyone into my plan and, as such, actually had NO "faithful" at all.   The best I could do was give the appearance that there were in fact faithful and hope that getting the Warpac troops in would yield some results. 

I am certain that had the game continued on for any period of time, I would have been toast most likely from my own side for extremely good reason.  There are only so many times that you can explain away someone accidentally slashing their own throat while putting peanut butter on crackers behind the motor pool after all... 

I am happy to say however, that this East Wind, the last East Wind, is the only East Wind that I have survived from beginning to end and I even managed to do it with most everyone out to kill me!   Except reporter #2, he certainly seemed to be one of the faithful...

Logged
Mercy
Global Moderator
Knows what he's talking about...
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 1253


Army # 24172366


« Reply #11 on: March 18, 2015, 01:12:52 pm »

Well yeah, but in game there was no way I could know that until it proved out. Smiley  Which is why you had some phantom troops to support you early on, I wasn't sure where your character was going but the little clues over the week pointed to slightly crazed not full on Jim Jones.  That was awesome!

« Last Edit: March 20, 2015, 09:53:32 am by Mercy » Logged

There's an east wind coming, such a wind as never blew on England yet. It will be cold and bitter and a good many of us may wither before its blast. But it's God's own wind none the less, and a cleaner, better, stronger land will lie in the sunshine when the storm has cleared.
Arbee
Recruit
*
Offline Offline

Posts: 43


Reportersoft


WWW
« Reply #12 on: March 18, 2015, 04:43:49 pm »

Sorry, your Holiness, but we found a letter from Reporter 2.0 to a friend some time after his return to the States:

Todd,

I hope this finds you well, you know how things have been.  Glad to hear that you're doing some good down there.  I wish I could be writing you for a happier reason, but you've pressed me about what happened over there and I just can't keep it to myself anymore.  I've told you about Zandai.  It was worse than that.

I arrived at the NATO position at Cottbus several days later than I should have.  The convoy I was riding with had run out of fuel, and we were ambushed a couple days after that.  When I reached Cottbus, I was cold, wet, and miserable, not to mention exhausted.  The first man I spoke to turned out to be the NATO commander, but he'd gone nuts.  Called himself the Bishop of Cottbus, said it wasn't a title you earned.  Made us call him "Your Holiness."  He put me to work immediately, but I knew better than to complain.  Kowtowing is the only way to buy yourself time to escape when dealing with madmen.  He actually planned to stand up to a rogue armored column, you know.

I was lucky, managed to get away with a British group.  I abandoned my camera, equipment and notes to avoid awkward questions later, and it paid off.  That's why I'm here at home and not rotting in some prison somewhere.  Just a civilian.  One of them did give me something to take home with me, however.  A journal.  Looking back, I believe it was a sentimental gesture, driven more by exhaustion than anything else.

I recognized the name on the inside, the owner had called me about two months before the whole thing, wanted to get out of local stuff and into combat journalism.  I pointed him in the direction of 315 RRC, figured it was safe enough to cut his teeth on.  I was headed out there anyway, figured I could give him a few pointers.  Wish I'd got there sooner, he might've lived.  Had his throat cut by the Bishop himself.  I've seen worse ways to die, never felt responsible for it, though.

The kid actually told him the people have a right to know.  I'm just waiting for enough time to pass before the world feels the same way.

This is all too depressing.  My best regards to your wife and son.  Hope to be down that way soon, all depends on how things go up here.  I'll tell you more about it then.  Stay safe.

Sincerely yours,

A Bennett



I don't know what you were planning on doing for the last bit, but if the 3rd Shock Army had come rolling through, Reporter 2.0 would have taken whatever opportunity he could to slip away before the action started, whether anyone else did or not.  I'd basically settled on "inexperienced, keen, naive" for 1.0, figured I'd go with "experienced, cautious, survivor" with 2.0.  Still working on the bulk of my AAR for 1.0, but I'll have it up soon enough.
« Last Edit: March 18, 2015, 09:16:12 pm by Arbee » Logged
Mercy
Global Moderator
Knows what he's talking about...
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 1253


Army # 24172366


« Reply #13 on: March 19, 2015, 04:45:35 am »

True when I approached reporter 2.0 in Cottbus to try to solicit some aid I got brushed off right quick...clever fellow.
Logged

There's an east wind coming, such a wind as never blew on England yet. It will be cold and bitter and a good many of us may wither before its blast. But it's God's own wind none the less, and a cleaner, better, stronger land will lie in the sunshine when the storm has cleared.
Rekkon
Might know something...
***
Offline Offline

Posts: 112


« Reply #14 on: March 19, 2015, 09:13:22 am »

Still working on my AAR, but for now I will just say "wow."  East Wind blew the top off my milsim/immersion scale, and I only wish I had gotten off my ass to attend earlier.  Many thanks to everyone that made it possible.  I now also understand how EW "gets in you."  Last night I kept waking up thinking I had fallen sleep on radio watch, and I snapped the below photo after leaving the casino with the thought "where does it feel more normal to walk?"
Logged
Pages: [1] 2 3 ... 6   Go Up
Print
Jump to: