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Author Topic: What does all this weigh? Figuring out marching weights.  (Read 4399 times)
aswayze
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« Reply #15 on: November 14, 2014, 10:15:27 pm »

Aww isn't it cute when someone thinks the RF-10 is "big" 


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Mercy
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« Reply #16 on: November 15, 2014, 05:44:46 am »

T'internet says the RF10 weight is 12 pounds.

Can we stop implying that this is somehow a lack of manly he-man qualities; it's a logistics problem that everyone should take into consideration.  Everyone here can walk around with twice their body weight good for them, now what the fuck good are they after that?  

SLs make sure the loads are appropriate to the mission rather than "I've got the kitchen sink?"
What REALLY needs to go on this mission?
What happens if we get frago'd to a longer mission?

Let's get some learning occurring from the pros rather than "Just carry more wimp" as our solution.  


« Last Edit: November 15, 2014, 06:01:07 am by Mercy » Logged

There's an east wind coming, such a wind as never blew on England yet. It will be cold and bitter and a good many of us may wither before its blast. But it's God's own wind none the less, and a cleaner, better, stronger land will lie in the sunshine when the storm has cleared.
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« Reply #17 on: November 15, 2014, 06:12:38 am »

Yes, please.  My shoulders, injured from carrying too much weight, would appreciate it.
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« Reply #18 on: November 15, 2014, 07:48:20 am »

We have obviously be negligent in tricking some new guy into carrying a RT-524 claiming it's an armored backpack radio.  Grin
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aswayze
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« Reply #19 on: November 15, 2014, 07:56:26 am »

Yes, the RF-10 is 12 pounds.  It is BY FAR the lightest squad radio we have.   That was my point.  Just ask Zellion what he would think about a radio that weighs 1/3 of the one he carried and has 2x the transmit power. 

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« Reply #20 on: November 15, 2014, 11:11:38 am »

what makes the RF-10 is nice because the powers source is very light. The PRC-77 is reasonable until you add the 10 D-Cell batteries it uses for power, then it gets stupid heavy. Also don't forget the added weight of 10 spare D-Cell batteries. Grin its a great way to make your RTO hate RTO-ing.  Roll Eyes

Ben Miller, AKA Curfman 2, loves being the RTO, it makes him dance with joy.

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« Reply #21 on: November 15, 2014, 02:04:37 pm »

Batteries are a big problem to the modern soldier. The average American Soldier carries 8-10 pounds of batteries just for personal gear. That's not counting specialty soldiers that carry things like mine detectors or anything else battery operated. All in all, it makes up about 20% of what we carry. Heck, my PSG and I usually carried a couple pounds of just AA/AAA batteries for DAGRs, flashlights, mine detectors etc. A 0.2 pound item by itself is no big deal, but 30 of them is.

As Clausewitz said, "Everything is very simple in war, but the simplest thing is difficult." Almost every task required to win in a combat zone is easy by itself. It's only hard when you combine lots of simple task together. 

It's why troop leading procedures are so important. It's a framework that allows you to brake a large complex process, preparing for a mission, into small easy to complete tasks. Like completing your PCC/PCIs for the proper gear and equipment load. If you try to just wing it, you're more likely to forget some of the smaller task. Which will come back to bite you later. Best advise I've ever been given... when things are getting out of hand, take a tactical pause. A short stop to look over the situation and make an informed decision is often better then making three quick uninformed ones.

So next time your squad is packing to leave, get out of the middle of it and look over their gear. You might notice that one guy has all the claymores plus the AT4. Or that you could take the extra ammo/MREs from the radio guy and hand them off to a lighter riflemen. Or maybe you don't all need an assault pack of explosives. (P for plenty)     
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« Reply #22 on: November 16, 2014, 02:49:54 am »

Can we stop implying that this is somehow a lack of manly he-man qualities; it's a logistics problem that everyone should take into consideration.  Everyone here can walk around with twice their body weight good for them, now what the fuck good are they after that?  

Couldnt agree more with Mercy.   As a machine gunner my weight is going to be more than the guys in our Rifle Squads but im carrying around 40lbs of PPE  another 40bs of equipment and mission essential gear (On person) and thats not including my Ruck which is about 100lbs after.  Im topping out at close to 200lbs of shit that I personally have to lug around.  My knees are giving out due to wieght and jumps and ive only  been in for just over a year.

Ive proven that I can carry more than any other man in an Infantry Platoon as the gunner for months on end while deployed to Estonia where we conducting operations for 3 months straight. (when I didnt have an AB). Im here to say that doing so is woefully retarded.......


When we get to our OBJ our guys are F'ing wiped and most of the time we take mass Casualties because we cant maneuver with speed. 

It is not a sign of strength to carry more shit than you need. Its a lack of knowledge and is really embarrassing to be so overloaded that we cannot conduct follow on missions due to loss in combat power.

I know for a fact that almost every single guy at Eastwind is out of shape...working on physical improvement would actually help the carrying of weight issue some and on that part more should be done by individuals  but at some point it doesnt matter the shape your in and your physical limit is reached where you can no longer become effective. Mercy's point is well taken and is a philosophy of Eastwind (or at least it was)

The concept of the Light Fighter is lost on The US Army....it used to be taught as gospel in Eastwind but it requires the NCO's to conduct sustainment training over patrolling and the Participates to actually attend..... It requires training in person.  Patrolling is a perishable skill. 

The NCO level institutional knowledge has had gaps in it with the leave of many of us younger leaders at EW. the few old guard that was left wasnt enough to train up everyone with all the work that they where doing on Vehicles and logistics that took priority.  The newer lot never got the level of training we had and so its not surprising to see and hear people with issues about packing and load management. 

alot of new blood within the last few years. Hopefully some will continue to work with our community after Eastwind has its last event.


 
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Tyler Jackson,

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One Shepherd School of Leadership
aswayze
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« Reply #23 on: November 16, 2014, 03:35:41 am »

You hit the nail on the head Tyler. 

We lost a lot of training time when we had to incorporate so much repair and maintenance time instead.  I am happy to see guys like Bret stepping up to the plate and taking this problem on. 

For those of you who were not around early on in this process much of the myths about what we could and could not do were broken in the early days by monthly training events ran across the winter months.  Guys who were worried about dealing with temps in the thirties could then be advised on how to deal with them then by guys who had dealt with temps in the teens.    Troop management, navigation, dealing with wet/cold, dealing with commo, laying/recovering wire, setting up/breaking down tents, all of that stuff became our "new normal" during the fieldcraft and training weekends which allowed us to face East Wind I (among the worst weather wise) with confidence.

 
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Mercy
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« Reply #24 on: November 24, 2014, 06:14:02 am »

Yea back home, by the way airports suck. 

So my thought basically has been that a lot of institutional knowledge is going to go by the wayside and possibly a series of posts capturing that would be great as it's often not the big complicated stuff that trips us up.
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There's an east wind coming, such a wind as never blew on England yet. It will be cold and bitter and a good many of us may wither before its blast. But it's God's own wind none the less, and a cleaner, better, stronger land will lie in the sunshine when the storm has cleared.
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